Efficiency Ratio: Is Your Bank Profitable?

10 minutes

efficiency ratio

Banks are either hated or loved, depending on when you ask customers. If they’ve been approved for that loan or denied a refund of any fee, you will get different answers. As a value investor, banks and financial institutions can be a frustrating experience to try to value. They don’t fall into the same category that other companies do, so therefore they often get ignored. Today we will continue with our series of looking at the different formulas that can help us unravel the mysteries of these institutions. In this post, we will delve into the efficiency ratio and what it means, and how to calculate it.

“In the end, banking is a very good business unless you do dumb things.”

Warren Buffett

The cool thing about learning to value banks is that once you learn how to analyze one, you pretty much can analyze all of them. There are about 500 banks that trade on the major exchanges, so this should give you plenty of options to choose.

Now, don’t get me wrong they can be very complicated with all the financial instruments, heavy regulations, old account rules, macro factors, and the intentionally vague jargon to try to throw you off.

But at their core, all banks are similar in that they borrow money at one interest rate and then hopefully, lend it out at a higher interest rate, pocketing the spread between the two. Which is the main avenue that banks use to make money.

“You don’t make money on tangible common equity. You make money on the funds that people give you and the difference between the cost of those funds and what you lend them out on.”

Warren Buffett

Definition of Efficiency Ratio

The Efficiency Ratio is calculated by dividing the bank’s Noninterest Expenses by their Net Income.Banks strive for lower Efficiency Ratios since a lower Efficiency Ratio indicates that the bank is earning more than it is spending. … A general rule of thumb is that 50 percent is the maximum optimal Efficiency Ratio

Sageworks

Sounds and looks pretty simple, doesn’t it? And as ratios go it is pretty simple and straightforward.

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Owner Earnings: One of Warren Buffet’s Favorite Formulas

10 minutes

owner earnings

Earnings season is upon us, as Wall Street chooses which companies to reward for a good quarter or punish for a bad quarter. Wall Streets obsession with earnings happens every quarter, the give and tug of who is rising versus the fallen. As value investors we don’t necessarily play this game, we are much more interested in the long-term outlook, as opposed to the short-term focus of earnings season. Warren Buffett eschews this mania, and instead, he focuses on what he calls “owners earnings.” These earnings to him are a better representation of the true earnings of a company.

This short-term focus that Wall Street has can cause a stock to rise or fall quite quickly, sometimes in the same day. As the bears and bulls of each side of the trade rush in and out to try to get a better position. This volatility can be maddening, and certainly, test the will of many people.

Buffett rises above this madness and instead chooses to hold a long-term approach that focuses more on the fundamentals of the business as opposed to the short-term earnings of one single quarter. These earnings that everyone places so much focus on can, and have been manipulated before, sometimes to great effect.

Many investors have been blindsided by this manipulation and have lost a ton of money because of the greed and deceitfulness of others. One way to avoid this is to do your research, and another is to adopt a long-term view that focuses on the fundamentals of the business and to see that they are doing the right things to grow the business.

What are Owners Earnings?

In the 1986 Berkshire Annual Shareholder Letter Buffett outlined his thoughts on owners earnings.

“If we think through these questions, we can gain some insights about what may be called “owner earnings.” These represent (a) reported earnings plus (b) depreciation, depletion, amortization, and certain other non-cash charges such as Company N’s items (1) and (4) less ( c) the average annual amount of capitalized expenditures for plant and equipment, etc. that the business requires to fully maintain its long-term competitive position and its unit volume. (If the business requires additional working capital to maintain its competitive position and unit volume, the increment also should be included in ( c). However, businesses following the LIFO inventory method usually do not require additional working capital if unit volume does not change.)” 

Hubba, what? That was a mouthful, wasn’t it? Ok, let’s break this down a little bit. I liken it to eating a pizza, you can’t eat it all at once, as much as you would like, but eating it one piece at a time –

Owners Earnings = Continue reading “Owner Earnings: One of Warren Buffet’s Favorite Formulas”

GameStop: Is this Game Still Worth Playing?

9 minutes

 

GameStop

Recently GameStop (GME) has taken a beating in the market with the release of some very unflattering news. As we all know the stock market is a very unforgiving place.

GameStop came across my radar a few years ago when I was doing my regular screening looking for new opportunities. Until recently I hadn’t pulled the trigger on the company, but after digging into it a little more it appeared to be a great opportunity. In the light of recent news, I am wondering if I made a good decision or walked into a value trap.

I admit I was first attracted to the 6% dividend yield, which was very enticing. In addition to the low P/E ratio, it appeared this was a great opportunity, as well as other financial strengths.

In this article, I will take a look at my findings again and re-evaluate my decision to buy and whether or not to stay in at this point or to sell and just cut my losses.

Retail is a brutal environment and the competition can be fierce. With the recent announcement of Microsoft’s (MSFT) Xbox’s subscription service there has been a lot of concern among GameStop investors in how this will affect the company long-term.

Let’s take a look.

Business Overview

Founded in 1994 in Grapevine, Texas. GameStop operates more than 7600 stores now. These stores are located in the U.S., Australia, Canada, and Europe.

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Intrinsic Value Formula for Beginners

14 minutes

 

Stock Market

“The newer approach to security analysis attempts to value a common stock independently of its market price. If the value found is substantially above or below the current price, the analyst concludes that the issue should be bought or disposed of. This independent value has a variety of names, the most familiar of which is “intrinsic value”.

– Ben Graham, Security Analysis (1951 Edition)

Trying to determine the intrinsic value of a stock, car, home and iphone is an art form. There is no specific formula that can help you find the actual value of an item that does not have any error in it. There are many different formulas that can be used to determine the intrinsic value. But, unfortunately, there is no spreadsheet that you can plug numbers into that will give you that hard fast, rigid price.

Definition of Intrinsic Value

“A general definition of intrinsic value would be that value which is justified by the facts—e.g. assets, earnings, dividends, definite prospects. In the usual case, the most important single factor determining value is now held to be the indicated average future earning power. The intrinsic value would then be found by first estimating this earning power, and then multiplying that estimate by an appropriate ‘capitalization factor’”.

Ben Graham, Security Analysis

Or this from Joel Greenblatt,

“Value investing is figuring out what something is worth and paying a lot less for it.”

Finally this from Investopedia.

“The intrinsic value is the actual value of a company or an asset based on an underlying perception of its true value including all aspects of the business, in terms of both tangible and intangible factors. This value may or may not be the same as the current market value. Additionally, intrinsic value is primarily used in options pricing to indicate the amount an option is in the money.”

All of these definitions say it pretty well. Intrinsic value is used for many things. It is mostly associated with buying stocks but it can be used for just about anything. Cars, homes, iphones, a loaf of bread. You get the idea.

Value investors use this theory and formulas to determine what the value of a company is. They use it to help find out what price they need to pay to achieve a margin of safety.

Notice that I haven’t mentioned price much? This is because intrinsic value focuses on what a company is worth, not how much it is trading for on the stock market. Price does not equal value.

“Price is what you pay, value is what you get.”

Warren Buffett

This is the first line in the value investing manual. Well, maybe not. But it should be. Price is a function of the vagaries of the stock market. Mr. Market has a field day with the price.

Value is something much more valuable than the price you pay for something. Can you put a price on your home? No, but you can put a value on it.

In the stock market world finding the intrinsic value is of utmost importance. This gives us the ability to determine a margin of safety. Which is critical to determining whether or not this is a company we want to invest in.

Why does intrinsic value matter?

In a broad sense using an intrinsic value formula to calculate that value gives you the opportunity to decide whether or not to buy or sell a company.

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