Breaking Down the Two-Stage Dividend Discount Model for Beginners

11 minutes

two-stage dividend discount model

Dividends are the best friend an investor has. They are the gift that keeps on giving and finding a company that pays them consistently over a long period of time is a great way to build your wealth. Finding the intrinsic value of a dividend paying company is paramount to investing with a margin of safety. This helps protect our investments and grow our wealth. Using the dividend discount model is a great way to find that intrinsic value, and the use of the two-stage dividend discount model is a fantastic way to get a more precise view of that value.

Our goal is to find the approximate value of a company, not to quibble about the minor details, we must remember that valuation is an art. What one investor sees as value, another might see as a liability, it can be seen as in the eye of the beholder.

The dividend discount two-stage model is a little more involved than the Gordon Growth model that we addressed last week, but it is definitely doable on our part. We will walk through all the steps to help you calculate it on your own and give you examples to help illustrate what we are doing.

What’s the big deal with dividends, and why do we keep talking about them?

To give you an example of the power of dividends, let’s take a look at our favorite guru, Warren Buffett. Over the years Buffett has grown his wealth by investing in and buying businesses with strong competitive advantage (moat) that have traded at fair or better prices.)

His favorite company to invest in is one that pays him a dividend. Did you know that:

  • Over 91% of his portfolio is invested in stocks that pay a dividend
  • His top 4 holdings, which make up over half of his holdings pay a dividend yield of 2.9%
  • Best of all, most of his stocks have paid a rising dividend for decades.

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Tools That I Use to Be a Better Investor

6 minutes

 

Photo courtesy of engineerblogs.org

This is a list of the different tools that I use to help me find the stocks that I investigate, track, and purchase. It is an ongoing list and I discover new tools all the time. Please check back from time to time to see what may have changed. I will update as I discover new things. This is the fun part as we discover more ways to learn about stocks and how to invest. It is never over, the learning. 

Stock Screeners:

FINVIZ

This is hands down my favorite screener. It is super easy to use and has great information on all sorts of financial data. It is sortable by rows and you can edit out the data you don’t want. It does have a premium edition that enables you to export your picks into an excel spreadsheet.

One of the things I like about this particular screener is that you can sort by all the financial data I am looking for to weed out the stocks I won’t be interested in. For the value investing metrics that I look for it gives me great flexibility to edit those metrics out to help narrow down the choices.

It also has links to different news sources relating to the particular company you are investigating. Another perk of this site is that if you are looking for in-depth info on a company and need the data quickly it is easy to search for that data on their site.

One last perk, it is free!

GOOGLE FINANCE

This is another great screener that I will use to get additional ideas. I came across this website in general thru Preston & Stig from The Investors Podcast. They use this site for their stock screener. They send out a checklist for signing up for their newsletters that have some great ratios for you to screen for.

One of the things that I like about the Google screener is not only the ability to screen for stocks but also the ability to check on all the news in the financial world.

An additional plus is you can download the app as well so you can access all of these features from your smartphone as well.

Also free.

FINANCIAL DATA:

Morningstar

This is one of the best sites to gather financial data on any company that you are interested in. It has ten years of data, which can be difficult to find on many sites.

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